We bring you Bo’s special story from three points of view.

 

Bo as a foster dog… by Barbara Sheedy

 

Even though all the foster families love their foster dogs, one always stands out and Bo was mine. EGRR received a call about a Golden at the Humane Society in Daytona and asked if we wanted him. He was blind in one eye.  I drove to Daytona to pick him up.  All the workers were in love with him and lined up to say good bye before we left.  Bo was dropped off at Clint Moore for his check up and to be picked up by his new foster family.

 

A week later, Hermine called and said Bo had learned to open the door and was escaping the foster family’s house. I volunteered to take him to stay with me.  Bo and my adopted golden Ginger got along wonderfully.  We expected his adoption to be quick, as he was a sweet tempered great looking boy.  Unfortunately, the economy starting hitting and no one wanted to adopt Bo because of his sight problem.  During my vacation, Bo was boarded at Clint Moore and was brought to several events as an orphan looking for a home.  At one particular event, Dave, an EGRR volunteer fell in love with Bo, but couldn’t adopt him, so Bo continued to stay with me.

 

As time went on, Bo celebrated Thanksgiving with us; then came Christmas, and then New Years. He was fast becoming a member of the family and a very difficult decision was made to send Bo to another rescue group where he would have a better chance of being adopt him.  Dave refused to let that happened…

 

Bo’s Story as told to us by Bo

 

To Whom It May Concern:

I met my soon to be brother at an EGRR event where we had a great time, I knew he was still a puppy and need a play partner, as well as some guidance.  I was happy to fill that role, because I had plans for him.  I knew I was blind in one eye and losing my sight in the other, and I figured he would be able to help me later on.

 

When I arrived at my “forever” home, my new brother Allie and my new daddy helped me adjust. At first I wanted to escape (I had a reputation as an escape artist) and was a bit timid thinking they were going to hit me. I also had a real problem with thunderstorms which I have almost completely overcome, but I’ll let my dad tell you that part.
My vet told my dad that I was underweight, possibly because of a dental problem. I had to have a tooth pulled but now I can eat lots of treats.
Allie and I have a big yard to play in and I enjoy chasing balls in the pool. I have learned to run on the treadmill for exercise on rainy days. Going to rides to PetSmart to pick up food and treats is also fun.
Of course, I really enjoy going to EGRR events and seeing other Goldens and friends who took care of me prior to my adoption. Thanks to all of you for saving my life and making my new master very happy.

 

Bo’s Story by His Forever Dad

 

I first spotted Bo at an EGRR event playing with Allie, who belongs to my roommate.  This was a big surprise because Allie really did not know how to play, and it seems as if Bo was trying to teach Allie how to play.  I was told that Bo was looking for a “forever” home, and I thought that maybe my home could be the one, especially since the two dogs seemed to get along so well.  I discussed this idea with Allie’s owner, and we agreed to try it, since Allie needed a canine buddy to help him with his social skills, and Bo’s adoption was contingent upon there being another dog in the home.
Bo moved in with us and we were prepared that he might try to run away because we had been warned that he was an escape artist, having run away twice in his first foster home.  As it turned out, Bo was more afraid that we would leave him, and since I was home most days, Bo got used to the idea that I wasn’t going anywhere.  He listened to all the strange noises, and then would look to Allie for clues as to how to react.  They were both learning a lot from each other.  .

Bo was not a quick learner, probably because he was fixated on his toys.  It is possible that toys were something new to him.  In order to get him to learn, we had to minimize his toy time, so that he would become fixated on me. He also had confidence issues, and anytime his name was called, he would cower, duck and walk away as fast as he could, as though his very name were some kind of punishment.  It took many hours of his learning to trust before he would roll over for belly rubs.  Bo was also afraid of the pool when someone was in it, but he has gotten over that fear also.

 

His biggest fear was that of thunderstorm – severe enough to be called a phobia. When it thundered, he would shake so badly, it was as if he were having a convulsion.  He ran all around the house and climbed on people, looking for some sort of relief.  Over the course of time, possibly hundreds of hours, Bo has finally learned he can lie down and calm himself   new without any medication.  He does not shut down as many dogs do when they are fearful.  We worked on this because it was important that he be able to respond to commands even when he was frightened.  He was taught to go to his “safe” spot, which he now does automatically.  Our goal was to get him to be unafraid, relaxed, and confident, and to transfer that from his “safe” spot to anywhere.

 

Bo’s eyesight is not good and is getting worse, so to help him we had to place reflective tape on the bottoms of the glass doors.  He cannot usually see his toys being thrown for him to retrieve, but he can hear them fall and he can smell them, enabling him to find them and retrieve them.  He does best in bright daylight.  The eye specialist says that the best he can do for Bo is prescribe everyday eye drops and special vitamins, but that ultimately his vision will get worse.

 

Now that Bo has been living with us for 6 months, he is not crated and he and Allie have full run of the house.  He loves to greet people, kids and grown ups alike, and enjoys volunteering at EGRR events.  His nightmares have disappeared, and he sleeps well now.  He is like a little boy, fumbling around for something to say or do, to be accepted into the social circle. Although he is awkward at time, he is a happy Golden, and at the age of 10, his life is just beginning anew.